Traumatic Emplacement

A great post by Emily Johnston, Sr. Editorial Assistant at Spoon River Poetry Review, on how she’s teaching students studying gender violence to move beyond reading the stats to understanding how the violence and resistance to it lives in our bodies. She’s using an anthology with some of my work in it, Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence. Really great ideas for teaching about trauma!

Traumatic Emplacement: Poetry Emplaces Violence

Resistance is Poetry’s Legacy: Great Review of “Women Write Resistance”

Over at Blood Lotus: An Online Literary Journal, Stacia Fleegal has written a thorough and thoughtful review of the anthology Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence. Two sections of my long piece “Wanting a Gun” appear in the anthology, and are mentioned in the review. Read the entire review here: “How women poets can change the world”

Here’s her excellent, challenging introduction. Go read the rest!

I realized writing this piece is in itself a form of resistance. To speak at length and in unabashed praise of a collection of poetry written in mouthy backlash to the cultural norms of domestic violence, rape, childhood abuse, verbal harassment and assault on city streets, etc., is to stand with women as they refuse to stand for it anymore. It is to give thoughtful treatment to a problem that is largely being ignored by our lawmakers and our justice system, which is an attempt to extend the work these poets and this editor undertook in participating in the anthology. It is to defy anyone to suggest that these poems aren’t literary because they often sound colloquial, or to dismiss them as therapeutic or confessional or any of those other supposed “critical” terms that condescend to the kind of writing I and others call real talk. We can do that in poetry. Not only is it allowed, but resistance is poetry’s legacy.

Interview on Poetry as Transformation up at Menacing Hedge

Menacing Hedge features mini-interviews with Women Write Resistance poets Kathleen Aguero, Elliott batTzedek, Ann Bracken, Maria Luisa Arroyo and their WWR poems. http://www.menacinghedge.com/summer2013/interview-wwr.php

“If at the end of a poem you are who you were when you started the poem you have not dared to dwell in poetry nor dared to let poetry dwell in you.” – Elliott batTzedek